Muscles of the Leg

Part 1 – Posterior Compartment

Part 2 – Anterior and Lateral Compartments

About this video
This tutorial was creating using the Zygote Body web application. If you are having trouble viewing this, try the YouTube links: Part 1 Part 2

 

  • Fariah mubin

    kindly do tutorials on clinical scenarios of upper and lower limbs and thorax as well……that would be a great help.

    • anatomyzone

      will get working on a clinical series as soon as I have time! Thanks for watching

  • MLJ23

    First of all thank you!!!those videos are amazing!!!.
    According to f. netter the origin and insertion of the popliteus are opposite to what you said in the tutorail…

    thank you so much!

    • admin

      Hi there, glad you have been enjoying the videos! Yes the popliteus is a funny little muscle, I’ve had a search around in various textbooks and papers on the popliteus to see if I can find a general consensus, and a lot of textbooks describe the proximal attachment on the lateral femoral condyle as the origin and its distal attachment on the tibia as its insertion. The word origin usually refers to a point of attachment on a structure that does not move, and the insertion is the attachment on the part of the bone that does move. The origin is usually the proximal attachment.

      However this muscle is actually one of the few muscles in the body that has this inverse origin-insertion thing, where the tendon attaches more proximally, and the muscle belly lies more distally. Also, this muscle can actually act in both directions. Like I mentioned in the video, the popliteus can unlock the knee in extension by laterally rotating the femur on the tibia. But it can also do the opposite (and I didn’t mention this in the video), so it can medially rotate the tibia on the femur via its distal attachment. So I guess it comes down to how you define origin and insertion: if you describe origin anatomically as the proximal attachment, then yes – the origin is on the lateral femoral condyle, if you describe the origin functionally, as the point of attachment that remains relatively fixed then either attachment could be the origin!

      On balance, maybe I should have just gone with the origin being the proximal attachment as a lot of textbooks (except the 2006 version of Grays anatomy for students) say this!

    • anatomyzone

      Hi there, glad you have been enjoying the videos! The popliteus is a funny little muscle, I’ve had a search around in various textbooks and papers on the popliteus to see if I can find a general consensus, and a lot of textbooks describe the proximal attachment on the lateral femoral condyle as the origin and its distal attachment on the tibia as its insertion.

      The word origin usually refers to a point of attachment on a structure that does not move, and the insertion is the attachment on the part of the bone that does move. The origin is usually the proximal attachment.

      However this muscle is actually one of the few muscles in the body that has this inverse origin-insertion thing, where the tendon attaches more proximally, and the muscle belly lies more distally. Also, this muscle can actually act in both directions: like I mentioned in the video, the popliteus can unlock the knee in extension by laterally rotating the femur on the tibia. But it can also do the opposite (and I didn’t mention this in the video), so it can medially rotate the tibia on the femur via its distal attachment. So I guess it comes down to how you define origin and insertion: if you describe origin anatomically as the proximal attachment, then yes – the origin is on the lateral femoral condyle, if you describe the origin functionally, as the point of attachment that remains relatively fixed, then either attachment could be the origin!

      On balance, maybe I should have just gone with the origin being the proximal attachment as a lot of textbooks (except the 2006 version of Grays anatomy for students) say this!

      Sorry for the long reply!

      P.S. If you are interested, I can send you some links to some very boring articles on the popliteus muscle and how its attachments vary in different people…

      • MLJ23

        okay, I agree with you if the leg is in the air he can rotate both the femur and the tibia so i’m aceepting your explanation. I just wrote it because this is how we learned it but grays anatomy is also good;)

        Another Q: are you going to do a foot video?

        hopefully i’ll use it in my orthopedic internship=]
        and thank’s again!!!(for the videos & the quick reply)

  • Raveesh handa

    I am a PT student !! Thank you !
    this tutorial has really helped me a lot !! I request you to please make a nice tutorial on joints especially the knee joint !!! I ll look forward to clear my concepts from your tutorials :)

  • Mills

    All of your videos are clear and to the point of what is needed and great for both revision and learning. well done on your work so far. It has been of huge help.

  • Debbie14

    These video tutorials are so clearly explained, thank you so much !

    • Raveesh

      hi debbie !! did u get any reply from anatomy zone in your mailbox ??

  • rosa

    this is the most simplest tutorial i’ve ever gone thru and quite easy to understand !!!!! eagerly waiting for the respiratory………………..

  • vince

    very helpful…thnks

  • Drpatriciohdez

    Great link, thankyou

  • Nicola

    Thank you so much for making these tutorials! they are amazing… during the whole semester of dissection i haven’t learnt as much as I have within the last half hour of watching the tutorials! thank you! :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/sahil.awan.3990 Sahil Awan

    good job i learn very much from here thanks plz make some vedois on embryo and physio

  • sophia iaia

    hey! thanks for this! what program are u using to visualize these things?

  • simple

    You are my anatomy tutor online but i want muscle of the leg tutorial without the compartment